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Sprinklers in residential buildings: don’t compromise on smoke ventilation!
Moderator(s): Rogelio G. Reyes
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7/30/2015 at 4:09:39 AM GMT
Sprinklers in residential buildings: don’t compromise on smoke ventilation!

Dear Colleagues in Fire Protection!

Please find below tips for your consideration;

Sprinklers in residential buildings: don’t compromise on smoke ventilation!

There has been a trend towards fitting sprinklers in residential building, driven partly by the fact that this can enable the relaxation of other fire safety measures, including the extending of travel distances.

We are also aware of a couple of incidences where sprinklers have been used to justify omission of smoke control in residential corridors. We believe this to be a dangerous trend.

There is no doubt that in many instances sprinklers are able to control the spread of fire and in some cases, extinguish it completely. This is all very good, in terms of reducing fire damage and fire spread to adjacent areas but smoke control is installed purely to protect means of escape and saves lives, for which sprinklers offer only limited benefit.

We must not forget that it is smoke that kills, not fire! A fire (even a sprinklered one) produces a lot of toxic smoke that can have an impact on places far removed from the source of the fire.

So, do use sprinklers in your residential project, but do not compromise on smoke ventilation systems and ensure that your scheme is properly designed, taking account of the effects of the sprinklers on the fire size and smoke generation. 

Hope this Tips for Fire Protection System may help our colleagues in somehow to understand during design stage.

Cheers!

Ronald



7/13/2017 at 4:19:34 AM GMT
To all Residential and Commercial it is required for a toilet to provide sprinkler?


8/14/2017 at 5:55:25 AM GMT
If we follow strictly NFPA 13 which is used as reference by the fire code of the phils, the area of the toilet that exceed 5.1 m2 shall have sprinkler

But the problem nowadays is that some BFP officials are not aware of this area limitations then in some municipality theyjust requires it even without exceeding the limits